Great Marketing Success!

RIDE Founder's Zac Smith, Rachel Goldberg and Allison Shuffield spent the day with Kris Van Cleave from ABC7 News
RIDE Founder’s Zac Smith, Rachel Goldberg and Allison Shuffield spent the day with Kris Van Cleave from ABC7 News

The guys at Performance IQ clued me into a studio in Washington, DC who’s getting some fantastic media coverage.
Ride DC is a new start up located at 2217 14TH Street NW in
Washington, DC.

Take a peak at the local coverage they’ve received in the short time they have been open.

This local business news show – starts @ the :52 mark.

A nice mention and link in the Washington Post

Numbers can also rev up some healthy competition. That’s what I discovered when I hopped on a bike at Ride DC, a new cycling studio just north of U Street on 14th Street NW. Folks who show up there for class get a bottle of water, a towel to wipe off their sweat and the chance to see how hard they’re working projected on the front wall above the instructor.

There are no names on the leader board, which lists the bike numbers in order of their total power output (speed plus resistance). So all I knew was that I wanted to out-pedal whoever was on the bike ahead of me. As we climbed hills, sprinted and lifted our rear ends out of our seats, I was transfixed by the idea of inching a spot higher.

So, apparently, was the guy on Bike 15, who edged me out in the final minute of class. “My goal was to keep it in the top five,” said Barry Poechmann, 33, who lives in Logan Circle and is training for a triathlon.

And a review in the Washingtonian

In most fitness classes, glaring at the instructor is frowned upon. But at Ride DC, this behavior is accepted, even encouraged.

Although it wasn’t really Richard, my instructor, on whom I fixated throughout class—it was the screen behind him tracking my energy expenditure number. Earlier this month Ride DC became the first indoor cycling studio in DC to offer live-time tracking classes. Each bike in the 14th Street studio is outfitted with a cycling power meter that measures users’ average revolutions per minute (RPM), power (a combination of RPM and bike resistance), and energy output.

During the 45- to 60-minute class, riders’ stats are projected on the screen in the front of the room, ranking each rider based on total energy output. Britney beats and ’90s music blared through the speakers as I closely monitored my numbers while tackling rolling hills, climbs, and sprints.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

CAPTCHA
Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code